News Local

City pushes detour for BVJ traffic

By Josh Aldrich, Camrose Canadian

City of Camrose Director of Engineering Jeremy Enarson talks with Coun. PJ Stasko about the construction of the new 48 Avenue bridge still under construction in Camrose, Alta. on Thursday July 26, 2018. Josh Aldrich/Camrose Canadian/Postmedia Network

City of Camrose Director of Engineering Jeremy Enarson talks with Coun. PJ Stasko about the construction of the new 48 Avenue bridge still under construction in Camrose, Alta. on Thursday July 26, 2018. Josh Aldrich/Camrose Canadian/Postmedia Network

With the city expecting an influx of about 20,000 people for Big Valley Jamboree, administration is reminding all festival traffic to take Camrose Drive to get there. 

 

The 48 Avenue bridge connecting the east and west side of Camrose is still under construction. While construction has been extended by several weeks due to an error in planning the configuration of the lanes, it was never intended to be open for BVJ, which runs Thursday through Sunday. 

The City has installed signs at the entrance to Camrose on the west end to try to push large trucks and through traffic to Camrose Drive at 68 Street, and there will be more signs installed for BVJ, in particular for Monday when everyone packs up camp. 

"It's really not going to affect most people, it's really to try and encourage BVJ users, the clients that are leaving Camrose to use particular routes so that we do not have an issue where they are potentially going to hi power poles and signs and thing like that," said City of Camrose director of engineering Jeremy Enarson. 

There are a couple of detours through the city, including using Grand Drive on the north and a jog around from 53 Street to 50 Street on the south, they are only intended for local traffic. 

Enarson said their have been a few incidents in the detour — including a semi that took out a power pole while attempting the turn — but overall, most people have been able to handle the rerouting. 

"We've had a lot of surprised compliments from people who are saying it is actually working really well," said Enarson. "Obviously there is a delay for people getting around the construction site, there is congestion and people have to figure out how to get around and add some time to their travel time." 

 jaldrich@postmedia.com



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