The most important part of your home

By Andrey Sokolov, Camrose Canadian Lifestyles Contributor

It is more important to ensure a strong structure of a house than the aesthetics when purchasing a new home. This can save you from buying a money pit. Supplied

It is more important to ensure a strong structure of a house than the aesthetics when purchasing a new home. This can save you from buying a money pit. Supplied

Buying a home is going to be one of the most expensive purchases you will make in your lifetime.  

 

As such, the decision to buy a home should not be made based solely on aesthetics. Falling in love with a house that seems plucked from your dreams may satisfy your short term desires, however, long-term problems may be lurking underneath.  

Since there is so much uncertainty in today's market it is vitally important that buyers become more selective and cautious when looking to purchase a home and avoid the money pit. When purchasing a home you want to be knowledgeable, logical and level headed, these characteristics will save you time, money, and frustration down the road. 

Here are some structural things to look for when deciding on your next home. 

The rock of the home 

The structural component of the home is the most important aspect to consider while shopping because it will be the most expensive to fix if repairs are needed. Start in the basement, which can be tricky if the space is either insulated with frost walls or drywall. If possible, try to have a peek behind or feel for moisture, also look for water damage on either the insulation or drywall. Water seepage could point to either a crack in the foundation or water coming in from under the slab. You can also look at the exterior of the foundation since parging will crack if the foundation cracks, providing a possible entry point for moisture. 

The bones of the home 

Framing inspections can also be a challenge because you can’t see through the wall; however, the same practices that were applied in the basement can also be used here. Drywall, naturally, will bend a little over time, but cracking along the tape joints may indicate foundational movement. Look for cracks in the drywall, either on the walls or ceilings as a sign of trouble. Now just because there’s a hairline crack along the drywall doesn't mean there is a structural issue, however, it is something worth noting and investigating. Significant bows in either walls, beams or ceilings is yet another indication that the home may have structural issue. If there is an exterior deck, take a look underneath it and see how all the lumber members look (posts, joists, beams, etc.), usually it’s pretty easy to tell if the lumber is aligned, balanced, and in-tact, if something looks inconsistent or rotten then there may be bigger issues. 

Purchasing a home is a large investment that can be very rewarding, but it also comes with risks. Having as much knowledge as possible, along with a good team (realtor, home inspector…) can make all the difference in the world. As always, if there’s a topic you’d like me to cover, feel free to contact me directly. 

 



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