Entertainment

Corb Lund set for B.S. session

By Josh Aldrich, Camrose Canadian

Alberta country star Corb Lund is back at the Bailey Theatre on Tuesday for the latest stop on his B.S. with C.L. Tour at 7 p.m. The solo show will provide opportunity to interact with the fans, answer their questions and tell the stories behind his songs. File photo/ Camrose Canadian

Alberta country star Corb Lund is back at the Bailey Theatre on Tuesday for the latest stop on his B.S. with C.L. Tour at 7 p.m. The solo show will provide opportunity to interact with the fans, answer their questions and tell the stories behind his songs. File photo/ Camrose Canadian

Corb Lund is returning to the Bailey Theatre, but this time he is leaving the Hurtin’ Albertans at home. 

 

The country music star, who made his name off of early 2000 hits “The Truck Got Stuck” and “It’s Time To Switch to Whiskey,” has been touring hard for the last several months through the U.S. and is coming home for a more laid back, intimate trip through Western Canada. On Tuesday he will pull into Camrose for a night of storytelling and conversation with a sold-out audience on the B.S. with C.L. Tour.

“It’s kind of fun because usually I play with the band, but going solo I get to talk about the songs a little bit more and chit chat,” said the Alberta cowboy. “It’s pretty fun, I really enjoy it, it’s a nice change of pace.”  

Lund will be taking requests and will be there to answer any questions one might have about him and his songs, though he is encouraging people to contact him through his various social media outlets (on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at @CorbLund). He says he generally people are a little shy at concerts to bring questions forward in person. 

Social media has completely changed the way artists interact with the fans from when Lund first started out with the rock band The Smalls in 1989. Lund has been interacting with fans over the last several years with journal-style video entries on his Facebook page.  

“It eats up an awful lot of time is what it does, I have a hard time delineating between taking care of all of that business and writing songs — it’s actually slowing me down in my creativity,” said Lund. “It’s kind of neat on the one hand because you reach out to people and tell them what you’re up to and tell them about your shows. But it’s actually a detriment to creativity because I don’t have time to write songs anymore. I’m trying though.” 

His willingness to interact with his fans has always been a big draw for his base, along with the fact he tells actual stories always based in some truth in his songs. It is his preferred way of communicating when it comes to topical social or political issues as opposed through interviews or spouting off. 

“It feels like things are so politicized these days that if I say something it takes the focus away from what I’m trying to do, which is play music and reach people with music,” said Lund. “I put it in the songs, so you can take what you want from the songs, but I don’t know if anybody really needs to hear people ranting about their political opinions. It annoys me and I’m assuming it annoys other people.” 

One of those truths in his most recent album, Weight of the Gun, talks about the pressure to constantly produce hits, because as quickly as one rises to the top, it can all be taken away, as told in the song “Washed-up Rock Star Factory Blues.” The man often compared to Ian Tyson for a new generation, says he has insulated himself from those types of pitfalls through the connection he has created with his fan base. 

“The kind of music I do makes a connection with people,” he said. “A lot of the music that’s on the radio is more transient and more transparent, it doesn’t stick around as long.” 

That connection has even led to a tribute band called the Wine Soaked Preachers who played at Big Valley Jamboree this year. Lund has seen the band play a few times and knows them quite well. They play a lot of his music off of his first two albums from the mid-to-late 1990s, stuff Lund does not play much of anymore. 

“They’re pretty good at it, they’d be a good opening act too,” said Lund. “It’s fun watching them. It’s like that scene from Being John Malkovic where he looks around the room and there are John Malkovices everywhere. If I’m drunk I get up and I sing songs with them sometimes.” 

Part of Lund’s staying power is his efforts to branch out into other areas of the business and his willingness to work hard. 

His efforts in the last few weeks include a charity concert in Twin Butte in support of the Kenow Fire victims, and he recently played with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra. It was the second time he has played with an orchestra, and while he has no plans for a Metallica-like album he does not rule it out completely, noting the prohibitive cost of putting together such a record. 

“It’s really super cool, it was challenging and kind of scary but it turned out real good,” said Lund, who is slowly picking away at writing a new album with no set delivery date. 

But that is also a completely different type of show than what Lund will be bringing to the Bailey on Tuesday at 8 p.m. It will be him, a guitar and stories that will captivate everyone. 

“The whole thing is very informal, it feels like my living room,” said Lund. 

 jaldrich@postmedia.com  



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